Category Archives: muzak

THE #REALHIPHOP FILES // featuring KILLAH TRAKZ

some more of that #REALHIPHOP knowledge via Killah Trakz.

KILLAH_TRAKZVEE: before we get into it, could you kindly introduce (or re-introduce) yourself to the folks at home? how’d you get into this music thing and what continues to drive you to pursue it?

TRAKZ: Peace, my name is Killah (pronounced Kill (ah)) or K allah Trakz. Got into music from my childhood friend and partner in rhyme Brian Goode. In all honesty I just one day started freestyling out of thin air and it stuck. I’ve heard some of my songs got people emotional, even changed lives. I’m Haitian and it’s tough having strict parents who follow a more traditional role in upbringing children in a dominant way, so since I was always in seclusion I kept rhyming. I feel as though this new generation associate my heritage with street credibility, but as artists we’re overlooked and I want to really break that barrier.

VEE: how did your contribution to #REALHIPHOP come about & had you worked with Pete before?

TRAKZ: I worked with Seattle-based producer Kev West on a project called #IHATEMIXTAPES which did phenomenal in numbers, and I guess Kev and Pete have history and the two spoke of me and now I’m here. This is my 1st time working with Pete.

VEE: what is your writing process like & how involved do you get with the producer when coming up with topics or themes?

TRAKZ: My writing process ….. If you hear, see, or I reply “WOO!” then the record’s done. 15 mins to write, 30 to record, so an hour of turn around time.  And producers usually give me full creative control on what I rhyme about.

VEE: this may seem like an overdone question to ask, but considering the album’s bold title, what is your own personal definition or interpretation of “real hip hop”?

TRAKZ: Real hip hop is like explaining love. It’s a definition so broad and so wide (pause) there’s no one word or a fair sentence to describe it. So I’ll go with emotions through the beat, the rhymes, and the mood/setting.

VEE: what’s the last piece of hip hop music you heard that flipped your wig?

TRAKZ: Eminem‘s “Rap God” or Busta Rhymes, who always re-invents himself. Between those two but Eminem‘s “Rap God“, sheesh.

VEE: last but not least, where can people go to check out your music or to get at you for shows or features?

TRAKZ: go to you favorite search engine and type Killah Trakz and everything would show up on me.

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THE #REALHIPHOP FILES // featuring DVS JACKSON Esq.

today we have a nice chat with one of MY personal favourite emcees that i’ve not only encountered in the last decade, but also had the pleasure of working WITH in some capacity. and that’s signor DVS Jackson Esq. this man’s wordplay has long impressed the fuck out of me, and to have him included on Pete‘s #REALHIPHOP LP is something i was kinda hoping for (actually i wanted a whole project to materialise b/w the two, but this is a damn good start).

DVSVEE: before we get into it, could you kindly introduce (or re-introduce) yourself to the folks at home? how’d you get into this music thing and what continues to drive you to pursue it?

DVS: Hello, world. My name is The Most Honorable Right and Exact DVS Jackson, Esq. DVS for short. I started out as a public speaker when I was still in Kindergarten. As I got older, that morphed into singing, then poetry and, finally, Hip Hop. I’ve been an MC for the better part of 15 years, and loving every minute of it. My motivational factors are a genuine love for the culture, a feeling that I have something to say…and the knowledge that after all of these years of dedication I’m still skilled at my craft.

VEE: how did your contribution to #REALHIPHOP come about & had you worked with Pete before?

DVS: My contribution came from Pete asking. Pete and I have known one another for almost a decade. We have dabbled here and there creatively, but there has never been a project tied to us. A vocal guest spot here, a remix there, but never anything concrete. So, when Pete mentioned he had a project in the works and wanted me to contribute, it was just a natural progression.

VEE: what is your writing process like & how involved do you get with the producer when coming up with topics or themes?

DVS: My writing process varies. I tend to write very quickly when inspired or when I have an idea of the intended direction. As such, my contributions to #REALHIPHOP didn’t take very long. Pete has always had a very good handle on what he is trying to accomplish. He also allows space for the artist to express themselves. It was really quite painless.

VEE: this may seem like an overdone question to ask, but considering the album’s bold title, what is your own personal definition or interpretation of “real hip hop”?

DVS: That’s a tricky question. I don’t think there is a real definition of what you consider “real”. Reality is relative. For instance, if you ask me who I listen to in the whip…I’m going to say Roc Marciano, Action Bronson, classics like De La and Tribe…and that’s my version of reality. Now my son, he is a huge fan of Flatbush Zombies. That’s his reality and I honor that. And since I honor his opinion, as well as my own and others who may not have as much “love” for the culture in the traditional sense…I tend not to trash Hip Hop I don’t personally understand or appreciate. I just don’t listen.

VEE: what’s the last piece of hip hop music you heard that flipped your wig?

DVS: Chance The Rapper‘s “Acid Rap Mixtape” completely threw me for a loop. Here was someone representative of my eldest child’s generation who obviously had some sense of MY oldhead sensibilities. In addition, he made a very CHICAGO album. There are so many inside references that hit especially hard for someone born and raised in the Go. From wordplay to his homage to Chicago’s “Juke” movement to a playful irreverance i feel the artform is missing….I totally honor and respect that young brother’s contributions to the game.

VEE: last but not least, where can people go to check out your music or to get at you for shows or features?

DVS: Well, my latest LP “DVS 4 Alderman” was released on Windimoto Records and is available at most online retailers, with an expanded edition available directly at http://windimoto.bandcamp.com/album/dvs-4-alderman-bandcamp-exclusive-expanded-edition.

I also have 4 EP’s that I’ve released for the unbelievable price of Free.99 available at http://waldorfandstatler.bandcamp.com with my partner in crime/brother from another mother tREBLEFREE. tREB is currently screaming at me to get my vocals in for the next EP…so stay tuned as more Waldorf And Statler is on the way. Thank you sincerely for you interest…and tell Pete Marriott to hurry up and release this album so I can get my cheque. Dreams don’t run off promises, goddamnit.

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THE #REALHIPHOP FILES // featuring JAZZ

we continue on with our dedicated coverage of all things #REALHIPHOP featuring a short interview with Jazz, who contributed to a couple of the joints on Pete‘s LP. he breaks down his musical history, production/songwriting process and his thoughts on hip hop.

JAZZ (aka Mista Jazzluvah)VEE: before we get into it, could you kindly introduce (or re-introduce) yourself to the folks at home? how’d you get into this music thing and what continues to drive you to pursue it?

JAZZ: First and foremost I am Mista Jazzluvah, formally of the Hip Hop/R&B group WHISTLE. We had such hits as “(Nothing Serious) Just Buggin‘”, “Right Next To Me“, “Always And Forever“, “Barbara’s Bedroom” and “Chance For Our Love“. I have wanted to do music ever since the 4th grade. I got my start in 1985 by way of Kangol Kid and Hitman Howie Tee.

VEE: how did your contribution to #REALHIPHOP come about & had you worked with Pete before?

JAZZ: Well Pete and I go way back to the days before WHISTLE. We both lived in Flatbush, Brooklyn and rocked out in the same musical circles. He and I reconnected about two yrs ago and talked about me coming back and doing my style of R&B. From there he did a track for me and sent me some songs he wanted me to drop hooks on. I wrote the hooks to two joints (“Nice” and “Lookout“) and the rest is history.

VEE: what is your writing process like & how involved do you get with the producer when coming up with topics or themes?

JAZZ: Well I write what I feel. I am a songwriter/producer myself so I just get the vibe or hear the track and give my viewpoint of what I hear. There are too many so called producers who aren’t that at all. I am a throwback to the days of Quincy Jones, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, LA and Babyface, Gamble and Huff, Teddy Riley the list goes on. My Job is to make a song better. It doesn’t matter if I wrote it or not.

VEE: this may seem like an overdone question to ask, but considering the album’s bold title, what is your own personal definition or interpretation of “real hip hop”?

JAZZ: Real Hip Hop is hip hop from the soul. The kind of hip hop that takes you to a time and place that you cant forget. No matter what time frame or style.

VEE: what’s the last piece of hip hop music you heard that flipped your wig?

JAZZ: I am feeling anything that has a flow and substance with good lyrics. I will always love hip hop even when I don’t like certain rappers or songs. I came from the essence of the block party and tape days. I feel like I am a singing Emcee. I flow on R&B.

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THE #REALHIPHOP FILES // featuring LaVeda DAVIS

as part of this BLAUG’s ongoing coverage of all things #REALHIPHOP, we got individual interviews lined up with most of the artists and contributors to Pete’s project. we’re kicking it off with the lovely LaVeda Davis. she breaks down her art, her process and how she came to be on the LP.

LaVeda DavisVEE: before we get into it, could you kindly introduce (or re-introduce) yourself to the folks at home? how’d you get into this music thing and what continues to drive you to pursue it?

LAVEDA: Greetings. My name is LaVeda Davis. I’m a singer/songwriter originally from Miami, FL, and I have been singing as long as I can remember. My father played music all the time when I was growing up. I heard Luciano Pavoratti, Leontyne Price, Sarah Vaughn, Johnny Hartman, Otis Redding, War, Brooke Benton, Marvin Gaye, John Coltrane, Stevie Wonder, SalSoul Orchestra, Barry White, Issac Hayes, Santana, Ohio Players, Barbara Streisand, Dionne Warwick, Motown, Nancy Wilson, Shirley Bassey and many others.  I knew early on, that I wanted to sing.
I stay driven and inspired because I love music, and want to leave behind a catalog of great songs.

VEE: how did your contribution to #REALHIPHOP come about & had you worked with Pete before?

LAVEDA: Pete reached out to me and talked a bit about his upcoming project (#REALHIPHOP) and said he had a track in mind he wanted me to hear, and wondered if I would be interested in writing the hook and a few ad-libs if inspired. I fell in love as soon as I heard JunClassic. The track is dope, and I was humming to it immediately!!
This is the second time working with Pete. He remixed a single of mine (“Second Skin”), that will be released in the near future.

VEE: what is your writing process like & how involved do you get with the producer when coming up with topics or themes?

LAVEDA: Pete has been the only producer that had a theme in mind. Other than that, I am given free reign once I receive tracks. Generally, I listen several times, and let the music dictate what the story will be about. There have been rare occasions that a title will come first; and I will begin there. But usually, I will be lead by the mood of the track.

VEE: this may seem like an overdone question to ask, but considering the album’s bold title, what is your own personal definition or interpretation of “real hip hop”?

LAVEDA: For me, “real hip hop” is the raw, honest and imperfect soundtrack to our lives. You want to wear the message like a piece of armor.

VEE: what’s the last piece of hip hop music you heard that flipped your wig?

LAVEDA: Anything by JDilla, flips my wig. I haven’t a clue to what is going on right now. What I have heard, doesn’t make me want to hear it again. So when I need my fix; I go old school (Tribe/Pharcyde/Slick Rick/Poor Righteous Teachers/De La Soul/Raheim/EPMD/KRS-1).

VEE: last but not least, where can people go to check out your music or to get at you for shows or features?

LAVEDA: Thanks so much for the invite. Was a pleasure chatting with you.

For Booking and features:
bookinglaveda@gmail.com
Manager – Stevie Robinson.

My new single was just released on HSR Records (#42 on Soulful House/Traxsource):
I SECOND GUESS MYSELF

SPEECHLESS (The Remixes)

LET LOVE HAPPEN (EP)
FACEBOOK
SOUNDCLOUD
TWITTER #1
TWITTER #2.

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Vahé:LeisureCAST – 027. ///MACADOCIOUS///

MACADOCIOUS

Vahé:LeisureCAST – 027. ///MACADOCIOUS///

in an attempt to finally catch my own tail and restart this BLAUG somethin proper, here is a 3+hr mix of the finest unheralded, underrated and largely unheard G-FUNK classics i could find (released approx. 4 months ago). i spent many months sorting through hundreds of joints to arrive at these 47. plz enjoy in good health, and by that i mean smoke a fat one n float off to the sounds of the fonk.

tracklist:

01. domino – macadocious
02. kid fresh – hard wit da smoothness
03. asa – the other day
04. da fam – i like (feat. el debarge & amg)
05. peeps – why (prod. by battlecat)
06. lil’ gene (aka mr. sandman) – 1996
07. big jake – pimp til i die
08. dallah’ man (aka jimmy da gent) – hey you
09. mc quake – drop top caddy
10. boo – 12 in the mornin’
11. presidential playas – gotta be down
12. mr. x – playa’s life
13. double k.o. – trop a l’ouest
14. b.g. knocc out & gangsta dresta – compton hoe
15. dead end – my deeds is done (remix)
16. g pack – pass the dank
17. big fellas – we put it down
18. kock d. zell – reason
19. sk – real good
20. 3-2 – them against me
21. rev up musicc – live 4 die 4
22. fat daddy – not one could do me
23. flow click – rollin’
24. battlecat – swerve on
25. n sane – female gee (feat. le le)
26. 815 click – feel it
27. aelpeacha – mets de la funky
28. ceaser – thank god
29. the dove shack – smoke out (feat. montell jordan)
30. cleaveland city crooks – throw ya’ hands up
31. poppy – my day
32. gangsta boogie – block party
33. romey rome – bounce with me
34. city to city – suspect
35. mob affiliates – paper chase
36. pat chilla – hard on my grind
37. daddy-d – southside
38. pede – let me be
39. g double p – high
40. dee arthur – cognac sippa
41. that nigga winfree – it’s the juice (feat. milki, the mad wun)
42. hakim & j-mack – playalasticshitwedo
43. l. g. wise – responsibility
44. macadocious ent. – smoke with me
45. mad dog clique – heartless
46. 4 trey – ghetto situations
47. mw ghetto soldiers – smoke on.

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2-FOR-1 Nu Mixes For That Ass // THE HOUR’S GETTING LATE + L.I.A.S.Y.N.F (LOVE IS A SONG YOU NEVER FORGET)

i managed to squeeze a couple of new additions out into the LeisureCAST family (now almost 4.5 years deep) over the last 7 days, the first (#025) covering 2.5hrs of obscure 60s & 70s psychedelic blues rock to put you into some kinda hippyish trance. the 2nd (#026) delves into chill territory from whence my mixmastering and love of music was birthed, and includes a nice even mix of old faves and brand new bangers (but nothing really before the mid-90s). til i get the archives sorted and provide the tracked/separated versions (via mediafire), plz enjoy em as standalone mp3 files via SoundCloud below 🙂

COVER

Vahé:LeisureCAST – 025. THE HOUR’S GETTING LATE

trackleest:

01. morgen – love
02. pinnacle – astral traveller
03. octopus – restless night
04. bang chan – nhung dom mat hoa chau
05. the zig zag people – peel it off your face
06. bent wind – mistify
07. aum – you can’t hide
08. the things – i don’t believe
09. ashkan – one of us two
10. dog soldier – pillar to post
11. the open mind – i feel the same way too
12. may blitz – smoking the day away
13. jasper wrath – odyssey
14. saturnalia – and i have loved you
15. ultimate spinach – visions of your reality
16. strawberry alarm clock – curse of the witches
17. blue cheer – peace of mind
18. tea company – you keep me hangin on
19. them – square room
20. ash ra tempel – light look at your sun
21. krokodil – sunlight’s beautiful daughter
22. meic stevens – yorric
23. hurdy gurdy – peaceful open space
24. insect trust – special rider blues.

cover

Vahé:LeisureCAST – 026. L.I.A.S.Y.N.F (Love Is A Song You Never Forget)

trackleest:

01. cassius – interlude
02. eric roberson – still (dj kemit & ahmed sirour remix)
03. om’mas keith – slow motion
04. don-e – find you
05. brushing dead – everybody wants your pussy
06. dre-kay – longing for tomorrow
07. adriana evans – after the party
08. shafiq husayn & the dove society – twelve (feat. breezy lovejoy, j. mitchell, jimetta rose & mprvs)
09. laurnea – sun don’t rain
10. static major – playground
11. ambersunshower – serengeti plains
12. darryl reeves – she said
13. sweater beats – anxious
14. adrian younge presents the delfonics – lover’s melody
15. bilal – catch what i’m throwing (prod. by steve mckie & adam blackstone)
16. katriina – spared your kiss
17. i’ced – angel
18. tennille – yellow haze (feat. sir michael rocks)
19. king – in the meantime
20. rochelle jordan – shotgun
21. chris bowden – telescopic two
22. terrance downs – when we meet (prod. by chris brann).

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D’ANGELO + ?UESTLOVE // “Brothers In Arms” // Live @ Brooklyn Bowl // 04/03/2013

DnQuestoBrothersInArms

i know everyone’s still quite antsy in the pantsy bout D‘s upcoming return with that third untitled LP, but don’t pretend like you’re not enjoying the road LEADING to that album. i don’t wanna hear anymoar complaints bout this shit. i’ll even promise to not bitch n moan about it my damn self if yous don’t. yes? ok done deal. this recent duo-only gig @ Brooklyn Bowl should help with that promise, as it throws back to those beautiful chill b-side cuts from the Voodoo sessions, ones generally involving just D’ on keys and ?uesto on drums. they step it up a notch here though as D handles keys, bass and guitar solos, re-interpreting his own material and doin a gaggle of covers as well. much love to “soundbetter” for providing the full set in pretty decent quality. lap it up D-stans!

trackleest:

01. go back to the thing/let me have it all (Sly & The Family Stone cover)
02. cosmic slop (Funkadelic cover)
03. woman’s gotta have it (Bobby Womack cover)
04. the line
05. you caught me smilin’/africa talks to you /the asphalt jungle (Sly & The Family Stone cover)
06. tell me if you still care (The S.O.S. Band cover)
07. our love has died (Ohio Players cover)
08. the root
09. really love
10. alright
11. mother’s son (Curtis Mayfield cover)
12. new position (Prince cover)
13. africa
14. encore break
15. lady

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